2.2: Talking about a Heart Attack

This is an opportunity for you to practice talking about Coronary Artery Disease and Heart Attacks in ASL.

Steps to the Process

  1. View the diagrams and read the information in English
  2. Video yourself explaining the information in ASL
  3. View ASL resources about information
  4. Re-do your explanation ain ASL incorporating new ideas.

1: English Information and Diagrams about Coronary Artery Disease/Heart Attacks/Myocardial Infarction

Here is some information about Coronary Artery Disease and how that can lead to a heart attack (myocardial infarction.)

For more information, visit MedlinePlus.gov or the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute.
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Atherosclerosis

To understand how a heart attack takes place, you must understand the development of atherosclerosis

"Atherosclerosis is the hardening and narrowing of the arteries. It is caused by the slow buildup of plaque on the inside of artery walls. Arteries are blood vessels that carry oxygen-rich blood from the heart to other parts of the body. Plaque is made up of fat, cholesterol, calcium, and other substances found in the blood. As it grows, the buildup of plaque narrows the inside of the artery and, in time, may restrict blood flow."

Retrieved May 30, 2010 from: http://www.web-books.com/eLibrary/Medicine/Cardiovascular/Atherosclerosis.htm



Plaque may build-up in a coronary artery at the site of a tear in the lining of the vessel as demonstrated in the diagram below.

Plaque build-up

Heart Attack (Acute Myocardial Infarction)

A heart attack or acute myocardial infarction (MI) occurs when one of the arteries that supplies the heart muscle becomes blocked. Blockage may be caused by spasm of the artery or by atherosclerosis with acute clot formation. The blockage results in damaged tissue and a permanent loss of contraction of this portion of the heart muscle. The diagrams below illustrate how this happens.

coronary artery blockage

Acute MI


Symptoms of Heart Attack

Symptoms of a possible heart attack include chest pain and pain that radiates down the shoulder and arm. Some people (the elderly, people with diabetes, and women) may have little or no chest pain. Or, they may experience unusual symptoms (shortness of breath, fatigue, weakness).

Women are more likely than men to have symptoms of nausea, vomiting, back or jaw pain, and shortness of breath with chest pain.

Heart Attack Symptoms
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2: Create your own explanation in ASL

Use the above information (or more sites from the links on the web) to create an explanation of how the hardening and narrowing of arteries develops, what happens to the heart when it experiences a heart attack, and what the symptoms might be for a patient.

You can either create your video as if you are talking to an imagined target audience, or you can create an English explanation and create an interpretation of that.

Reflection Point

Now that you have created your first explanation, reflect on your work using the following questions:
    •    Without even thinking about expressing it in ASL, were there any portions of the concept described that still is challenging for you to understand?
    •    What areas in your description of the topic did you feel most effectively conveyed the information?
    •    What were areas in your description of the topic that were challenging for you to convey?
    •    What features of ASL are you hoping to incorporate more effectively in your second video, such as classifiers, spatial mapping, etc.?

Discussion ForumPost your reflection in the Discussion Forum on Heart Attacks under the questions under Working with Object: First Attempt

Use these reflections to help focus your viewing of the resources in the next section.

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3: View ASL resources related to the topic


View videos on DeafHealth.org.

This site has the following relevant videos:

Sample from Nigel


Sample from Doug




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4: Re-do your video of your ASL explanation

After having viewed the ASL videos, re-do your own explanation in ASL. Try to incorporate some of the new ideas that you saw.

Reflection Point

Now that you have created your second explanation, reflect on your work using the following questions:
    •    What did you see in the resources you watched - whether videos from Nigel, Doug, DeafMD.org, or others - that gave you new ideas in your second description?
    •    Did you feel that you were able to incorporate the ASL features that you had identified after your first video?
    •    Were there any areas that you still felt like you struggled with in your second description? (Consider focusing in on those areas in the next topic.)

Discussion ForumPost your reflection in the Discussion Forum on Heart Attacks under the questions under Working with Self:  Second Attempt

Use these reflections to help focus your viewing of the resources in the next section.

Last modified: Friday, 29 January 2016, 4:09 PM