2.5: Atrial Fibrillation

2.5: Talking about Atrial Fibrillation

This is an opportunity for you to practice talking in ASL about atrial fibrillation.

Steps to the Process

  1. View the diagrams and read the information in English
  2. Video yourself explaining the information in ASL
  3. View ASL resources about information
  4. Re-do your explanation in ASL incorporating new ideas.

1: English Information and Diagrams about Atrial Fibrillation

An arrhythmia is a problem with the speed or rhythm of the heartbeat. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common type of arrhythmia. The cause is a disorder in the heart’s electrical system.

Often, people who have AF may not even feel symptoms. But you may feel

  • palpitations -- an abnormal rapid heartbeat
  • shortness of breath
  • weakness or difficulty exercising
  • chest pain
  • dizziness or fainting
  • fatigue
  • confusion

AF can lead to an increased risk of stroke. In many patients, it can also cause chest pain, heart attack, or heart failure.

Doctors diagnose AF using family and medical history, a physical exam, and a test called an electrocardiogram (EKG), which looks at the electrical waves your heart makes. Treatments include medicines and procedures to restore normal rhythm.

From the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Afib

Click on the image above to go see an animation of atrial fibrillation.  (Requires Flash, so will not work on all devices.)


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2: Create your own explanation in ASL

Use the above information (or more sites from the links on the web) to create an explanation of Atrial Fibrillation.

You can either create your video as if you are talking to an imagined target audience, or you can create an English explanation and create an interpretation of that.

Reflection Point

Now that you have created your first explanation, reflect on your work using the following questions:
    •    Without even thinking about expressing it in ASL, were there any portions of the concept described that still is challenging for you to understand?
    •    What areas in your description of the topic did you feel most effectively conveyed the information?
    •    What were areas in your description of the topic that were challenging for you to convey?
    •    What features of ASL are you hoping to incorporate more effectively in your second video, such as classifiers, spatial mapping, etc.?

Discussion ForumPost your reflection in the Discussion Forum on Atrial Fibrillation under the questions under Working with Object: First Attempt

Use these reflections to help focus your viewing of the resources in the next section.

3: View ASL resources related to the topic


View videos on DeafHealth.org.

This site has the following relevant videos:

Sample from Nigel

Sample from Doug

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4: Re-do your video of your ASL explanation

After having viewed the ASL videos, re-do your own explanation in ASL. Try to incorporate some of the new ideas that you saw.

Reflection Point

Now that you have created your second explanation, reflect on your work using the following questions:
    •    What did you see in the resources you watched - whether videos from Nigel, Doug, DeafMD.org, or others - that gave you new ideas in your second description?
    •    Did you feel that you were able to incorporate the ASL features that you had identified after your first video?
    •    Were there any areas that you still felt like you struggled with in your second description? (Consider focusing in on those areas in the next topic.)

Discussion ForumPost your reflection in the Discussion Forum on Atrial Fibrillation under the questions under Working with Self:  Second Attempt

Use these reflections to help focus your viewing of the resources in the next section.

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Last modified: Friday, 29 January 2016, 4:12 PM