2.4: Types of Diabetes

2.4: Talking about Types of Diabetes

Steps to the Process

  1. View the diagrams and read the information in English
  2. Video yourself explaining the information in ASL
  3. View ASL resources about information
  4. Re-do your explanation in ASL incorporating new ideas.

1: English Information and diagrams on Types of Diabetes

Information from the Friedman Diabetes Center at Beth Israel Medical Center

A Screen shot from Animation explaining different types of diabetesThe Friedman Diabetes Center created a series of visual animations specifically for people who are deaf and hard of hearing. 

For this topic, please view the one titled Understanding Diabetes.  (Requires Flash.  Will not work on iOS devices.)

Information from National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse

Insulin receptorsDiabetes is a disorder of metabolism— the way the body uses digested food for growth and energy. Most of the food people eat is broken down into glucose, the form of sugar in the blood. Glucose is the main source of fuel for the body.

After digestion, glucose passes into the bloodstream, where it is used by cells for growth and energy. For glucose to get into cells, insulin must be present. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas, a large gland behind the stomach.

When people eat, the pancreas automatically produces the right amount of insulin to move glucose from blood into the cells. In people with diabetes, however, the pancreas either produces little or no insulin, or the cells do not respond appropriately to the insulin that is produced. Glucose builds up in the blood, overflows into the urine, and passes out of the body in the urine. Thus, the body loses its main source of fuel even though the blood contains large amounts of glucose.

Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults, and was previously known as juvenile diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is needed to convert sugar (glucose), starches and other food into energy needed for daily life.

In type 2 diabetes, either the body does not produce enough insulin or the cells ignore the insulin. (This mechanism is shown in the diagrams with the insulin receptors.)  Insulin is necessary for the body to be able to use glucose for energy. When you eat food, the body breaks down all of the sugars and starches into glucose, which is the basic fuel for the cells in the body. Insulin takes the sugar from the blood into the cells. When glucose builds up in the blood instead of going into cells, it can lead to diabetes complications.

Source:  National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse

Video Explanation of "How Insulin Works"

This video gives a good visual description of how the physiological process works in the two types of diabetes.  Presented with captions.

2: Create your own explanation in ASL

Use the above information (or more sites from the links on the web) to create an explanation of the different types of diabetes and how they function. 

You can either create your video as if you are talking to an imagined target audience, or you can create an English explanation and create an interpretation of that.

Reflection Point

Now that you have created your first explanation, reflect on your work using the following questions:
    •    Without even thinking about expressing it in ASL, were there any portions of the concept described that still is challenging for you to understand?
    •    What areas in your description of the topic did you feel most effectively conveyed the information?
    •    What were areas in your description of the topic that were challenging for you to convey?
    •    What features of ASL are you hoping to incorporate more effectively in your second video, such as classifiers, spatial mapping, etc.?

Post your reflection in the Discussion Forum on Types of Diabetes under the questions under Working with Object: First Attempt

Use these reflections to help focus your viewing of the resources in the next section.

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3: View ASL resources related to the topic

Deaf MD Logo

View videos on DeafMD.org.

This site has the following relevant videos:

A sample from Nigel


A sample from Amy:

A sample from Lisa:

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4: Re-do your video of your ASL explanation

After having viewed the ASL videos, re-do your own explanation in ASL. Try to incorporate some of the new ideas that you saw.

Reflection Point

Now that you have created your second explanation, reflect on your work using the following questions:
    •    What did you see in the resources you watched - whether videos from Nigel, Amy, DeafMD.org, or others - that gave you new ideas in your second description?
    •    Did you feel that you were able to incorporate the ASL features that you had identified after your first video?
    •    Were there any areas that you still felt like you struggled with in your second description? (Consider focusing in on those areas in the next topic.)

Post your reflection in the Discussion Forum on Types of Diabetes under the questions under Working with Self:  Second Attempt

Use these reflections to help focus your viewing of the resources in the next section.

Last modified: Monday, 9 May 2016, 8:03 PM